The Next 100 Years – a bridgeway across the decisive century

The 20th century began to democratize the future, as science fiction and political utopias mesmerized millions willing to sacrifice their dull present for a promising tomorrow. This process inspired the creative genius of humanity and empowered multitudes to become inventors, artists, entrepreneurs, and activists

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The Next 100 Years

a bridgeway across the decisive century

 

THOSE WHO DARE

The allure of predicting what lies ahead has long captivated humanity. In ancient times, the knowledge of the futures was believed to be reserved for the all-knowing deities, who sparingly disclosed their secrets to kings, priests, and the righteous ones. The 20th century began to democratize the future, as science fiction and political utopias mesmerized millions willing to sacrifice their dull present for a promising tomorrow. This process inspired the creative genius of humanity and empowered multitudes to become inventors, artists, entrepreneurs, and activists. Yet, the attempt of making utopias real brought forth the darker side — many visions proving fake, leaving disillusionment in their wake.

The bright promises of better worlds failed to materialize. Neither politicians, scientists, nor engineers succeeded in liberating mankind from its troubles and constructing a heavenly realm on Earth.

In the early 2020s, the concept of the future has shifted from exciting to scary. The technological progress increasingly appears to bring more threats than benefits: digital control over society, genetic manipulation, killer drones, and above all, artificial intelligence jeopardizing the prospects of billions of workers — and in the long run, posing a risk to humanity itself. Ecological disasters, the imminent climate crisis, the destruction of the biosphere, and the transformation of the Earth’s surface into a barren desert. New world wars, the collapse of civilization, and the extinction of humanity looming large. Peeking into the futures has become distressing, and many people choose not to think about it at all.

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